The Parish and Population - Page 4
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As can be seen from the accompanying graph, the population declined steadily from 1841 (a close analysis would require a separate study) to its lowest point in both ends of the parish in 1936, when a number of factors appear to have halted the decline.  The Irish Land Commission adopted a policy of re-settling farmers from congested areas in the west of Ireland and transferring them to the midlands, where the Land Commission had bought and sub-divided large farms.  Among the first of these families (or migrants as they were known) to this parish were the families on the Newcastle cul-de-sac, Coyles, Barretts and Walshes who came in the spring of 1939 and were followed for the next twenty years by many other families.  A further reason for the halt in the decline in the population was the Emergency[i] when Ireland had to become self sufficient in food and fuel.  The combined effect of new families in the area, extra employment generated in agriculture and in Bord na Móna, the end of the Economic War[ii] (1932-1938), as well as other factors contributed to maintaining the population at around its 1936 level until 1971, when numbers started to increase again.  New housing developments in Enfield and proposed developments in Rathmolyon village should show a marked increase in population in the next census.

 

Hereunder are tables of stated religious preferences in the 1861, 1991 and 2002 census:

 

Census 1861

Religious Profession

Rathcore

Rathmolyon

Established Church

118

190

Roman Catholic

1876

1552

Presbyterian

-

-

Methodist

-

25

Independents

-

-

Baptist

-

-

Quaker

-

-

All other Denominations

2

-

Jewish

-

-

Total

1996

1767

 

Census 1991

Religious Profession

Enfield

Rathmolyon

Roman Catholic

1639

1031

Other stated

59

68

No religion

18

16

Not stated

35

28

Total

1751

1143

 

Census 2002

Religious Profession

Enfield

Rathmolyon

Roman Catholic

2247

1008

Other Stated

163

60

No Religion

55

24

Not Stated

31

12

Total

2496

1104

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

Jack Fitzimons, The Plains of Royal Meath, Kells, 1978.

 

Census figures © Government of Ireland 2003.  Material compiled and presented by Central Statistics Office.  Reproduction is authorised except for commercial purposes, provided the source is acknowledged.



[i] The name given in Ireland to the period of the Second World War, 1939 to 1945.

[ii] A name given to series of tariffs, financial and other disputes between the Irish Free State and Britain.  (Brian Lalor (Gen. Ed.), The Encyclopaedia of Ireland, Gill and Macmillan Ltd. Dublin, 2003, p. 335).